But, as adverbs, they work better when close to the verb they modify. Could you please tell me when/if "too" should be preceded by a comma at the end of a sentence? The rule goes something like this: When “too” is used in the sense of “also,” use a comma before and after “too” in the middle of a sentence and a comma before “too” at the end of a sentence. Definition: A comma separates elements in a sentence, such as items in a list or series, but it also shows that those elements are connected to each other within the same sentence. Don’t forget to also add a comma after the date to separate it from the rest of the sentence. Commas separate ideas, add pauses, and help you to list things clearly. a comma after "also" at the beginning of a sentence If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above.

That’s what I was told and that’s what I believed. And, that’s it.

If the part about Tommy is important, the best thing to do is get rid of the commas and change as well as to and.

Use a pair of commas in the middle of a sentence to set off clauses, phrases, and words that are not essential to the meaning of the sentence. In fact, the comma is one of … If just the month and year are mentioned in the sentence there does not need to be a comma. You're one of the senator's close friends, aren't you? 8.

The words too and also generally do not need commas with the exception of also at the beginning of the sentence.. In most cases, you need not use a comma before too at the end of a sentence or commas around it midsentence: She likes chocolate chip cookies too. If you use also as a conjunctive adverb at the beginning of the second clause of a compound sentence, you use a comma: I did not like it that much.

They also let us connect words, phrases, and clauses together to make longer sentences.

If you use also as a conjunctive adverb at the beginning of the second clause of a compound sentence, you use a comma: I did not like it that much. But, as usage experts note, you must use commas when too separates the verb from its object (Cook 126): I note, too, that you have eaten all the chocolate chip cookies. (original sentence) ->In the end… They have been dropped — many years ago, in fact. Use a comma near the end of a sentence to separate contrasted coordinate elements or to indicate a distinct pause or shift. Example 2: A: I'm hungry. Use a comma near the end of a sentence to separate contrasted coordinate elements or to indicate a distinct pause or shift. many of you have tired of reading my serial rant on the serial . Is it always necessary to put a comma after "also" at the beginning of a sentence? Missing commas can even cost a million dollars. The idea is that when one of these adverbs modifies a whole sentence, and especially when it comes at the end of a sentence, it should be set off with commas.