Joseph Keppler, Puck Magazine (1899) "This frequently reproduced cartoon, long a staple of textbooks and studies of Congress, depicts corporate interests-from steel, copper, oil, iron, sugar, tin, and coal to paper bags, envelopes, and salt-as giant money bags looming over … Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division. Udo Keppler’s often overshadowed by his father, the seminal satirical cartoonist and PUCK founder Joseph Keppler. 38 Samuel Ehrhardt, ‘History Repeats Itself: The Robber Barons of the Middle Ages and the Robber Barons of Today’, Puck , … Before the 17th Amendment, it was common that state legislatures were the ones that selected the United Senators. Joseph Keppler, Austria-born American caricaturist and founder of Puck, the first successful humorous weekly in the United States. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress. Another extends to North America — the suggestion, of course, being that the ungodly red menace was reaching for the United …

“He is a curious mixture of the lion, mule and octopus,” gobbling up territories along the route to India: Gibraltar, the Cape, Malta, Cyprus and the recently inaugurated Suez Canal. But Udo K. had no reason to be anxious about his own work, nor about his legacy: he… Samuel Ehrhardt, ‘History Repeats Itself: The Robber Barons of the Middle Ages and the Robber Barons of Today’, Puck, c. 1889. 3. Keppler became highly influential. Keppler was born on April 4, 1872 in St. Louis, Missouri. - Joseph Keppler, 1889 - fat "money bag men" coming in "monopolist entrance" - "people's entrance" closed - Senate unorganized - monopolists bigger and more powerful - "of monopolists, by monopolists, for monopolists" Lincoln's quote with "people" 2. The author of the cartoon, Austrian-born Joseph Keppler, was an immigrant himself. The octopus was a favourite symbol of conspiratorial power in the American populist imagination. These terms, along with the octopus itself, all portrayed racist views of Chinese and Mongolian immigrants. 1. Two Udo J. Keppler (April 4, 1872 – July 4, 1956), known from 1894 as Joseph Keppler Jr., was an American political cartoonist, publisher, and Native American advocate.The son of cartoonist Joseph Keppler (1838–1894), who founded Puck magazine, the younger Keppler also contributed cartoons, and became co-owner of the magazine after his father's death, when he changed his name to Joseph Keppler. Joseph Keppler, a cartoonist working for Frank Leslie's Illustrated established Puck Magazine in 1876. Upon arriving to the United States, he founded Puck, America's first successful humor magazine, which became wildly popular with a large audience. The author of the cartoon, Austrian-born Joseph Keppler, was an immigrant himself.

He changed his name to Joseph Keppler, Jr. in honor of his father. Photo Gallery. And perhaps Udo was self-conscious of this patriarchal eclipse: the younger Keppler changed his name to Joseph after the elder died. 37 Bernhard Gillam, ‘The Protectors of Our Industries’, Puck, 7 February 1883. "Next" by Joseph Keppler, published in Puck Magazine 1904 This political cartoon is of a "Standard Oil Tanker" shaped as an octopus. He graduated from the Columbia Institute in 1888, and studied in Germany in 1890 and 1891.

This 1888 cartoon, published in Punch, shows John Bull, the personification of the United Kingdom, dabbling in Egyptian waters. Answer the questions below about the political cartoon in the Episode 2 Investigation Box of your Episode 2 Chronicles. Upon arriving to the United States, he founded Puck, America's first successful humor magazine, which became wildly popular with a large audience.
The name of the magazine was taken from the elfin character in Shakespeare's Midsummer Night's Dream.Up until this time, American humorous journals had been modeled on Punch Magazine.However, Keppler refused to do this and created a different type of magazine. That way, they named their friends to the U.S. Senate.

In the cartoon “Welcome to All” by Joseph Keppler published in the magazine Puck on April 28, 1880, it portrays Uncle Sam standing in front of an ark with his arms open to immigrants, who are lined up in front of the ark. 56, SEPTEMBER 7, 1904. UDO J. KEPPLER, “NEXT!” PUCK VOL. He was with He graduated from the Columbia Institute in 1888, and studied in Germany in 1890 and 1891. the image of the OCTOPUS: six cartoons, 1882-1909* Nob Hill (neighbor-hood of the San Francisco powered elite) The Bancroft Library Frank Norris G. F. Keller, The Curse of California, illustration, The Wasp, 19 August 1882 1882 Wheat Export Mansion of Charles Croker (Southern Pacific Railway magnate) Wheat Ware House U.S. Bonds Mark Hopkins & Leland Stanford (Southern Pacific Railway … QUESTIONS Answer the following questions on a separate sheet of paper. This American anti-communist pamphlet, produced by the Catholic Library Service in 1938, takes the octopus metaphor one step further by depicting Soviet leader Joseph Stalin himself as the sea creature.